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Kurdish traditional & folklore
Topic Started: 7th April 2013 - 08:25 AM (19,958 Views)
Halo
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Têkoşer

Worldwar2boy
26th July 2013 - 01:10 PM
And he is really representing the freedom and Kurdish culture.
Like you said previously, there are some erotic elements in Kurdish culture (also in music), which you can see in his paintings. It's about time Kurds realize what their real culture is, instead of listening to religious clercs who are receiving money from their masters in Saudi Arabia, in order to deceive, disunite & confuse people. But their plans don't and will not work.
yes it's true, erotic elements have always exsisted in the kurdish culture and that truly shows how open minded we kurds are.
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Alasha: Asking and discussing is not forbidden, rather prohibited on this forum
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Kulka Kurdayati
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bullshit

Typical kurdish home - exibition in Amna Suraka, Slemanyi
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BIJI KURD U KURDISTAN
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Worldwar2boy
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It's not typical in large cities anymore.

That's more a typical home in the mountain villages.
biji kurd u kurdistan !!
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Kulka Kurdayati
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bullshit

Its traditional, from the past i think. Everything changes, also the style of the houses - i think now in Kurdistan people have too many chinese forniture at homes :D

And this is shop with antiques and other kurdish stuff in Qalla:
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Kulka Kurdayati
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bullshit

This pic could be in Nature topic as well, but for some reasons i think this flowers are a part of our culture and tradition - this are Nergz, which i got from my younger brother when i came to Kurdistan in march - it was so sweet:
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Tevger
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Kulka Kurdayati
27th July 2013 - 05:13 AM
Typical kurdish home - exibition in Amna Suraka, Slemanyi
When I see this picture I miss the homes of my grandparents. Their house was exactly like that. Situated in the Kurdish village with a large garden with plum and apple trees and fresh cucumbers and spring onion. Fresh eggs in the morning directly from the chicken's nest and lots of lots of fresh maden yoghurt and goat cheese. All the grand children would play together and in the evening, we would sit at the balcony and eat sunflower seeds and drink chai. Now everyone is moving to either the city or Europe, selling their cattle and earth and totaly forgetting about their ancestral homes and lands. :sad:
'' Don't touch me doctor! My death is necessary for the Kurds to wake up''
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Kulka Kurdayati
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bullshit

Everything is changing, heval. I think every person, when grow up can say - that there is not like it used to be during the childhood. But there are still a lot of villages in our country, a lot of people still live their traditional lifes. My family in Hewler live in the city, but they have a small house in the village, with the little garden - i know its not the same, but still they going there, cooking food among the fields and look after the plants, trees in the garden. It was their home village before, but it was destroyed to the ground by Saddam thugs - when we were there Heval Samira (Daya) showed me the remainings of her family home - the broken pieces of cups, pots and other stuff. It was really heartbreaking...
I made this pic and when Heval Sami (Bawka) saw it he said about me with the smile: "sagbab" :D - which was so sweet coz he wanted to express he likes the pic of their little village house - this is the house:
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jjmuneer
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Merg û Şeref

Most Ilamis still live like this:
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Halo
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Têkoşer

The last pipemaker in my city Mahabad

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9S0TaETWsY

" The last pipemaker in my city Mahabad" is an document film about an old man by the name Mohammad Mola Mohammadi. He was the last native and traditional pipemaker in the city of Mahabad in eastern Kurdistan ( The Kurdistan part of Iran). This old man has died in the same year.
This film has made by writer, photographer and human right activist: Sherko Jahani Asl in 2008.
Thanks to Azad Roorast who helped to making this film.
دواترین مۆدنەسازی شاری مەهاباد.
ئەم فیلمە بەڵگەییە لە بارەی دواترین مۆدنە سازی شاری مەهاباد لە ڕۆژهەڵاتی کوردستان" مەحەمەدی مەلا محەمەدی" لە ساڵی ٢٠٠٨ و لە لایەن شێرکۆ جیهانی، نوووسەر و چالاکی مافی مرۆڤ ساز کراوە. ئەم مۆدنەسازە لە هەمان ساڵ دا کۆچی دوایی کرد.
بە سپاس لە ئازاد روراست لە ئامادە کردن و ساز کردنی ئەم فیلمە.
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Alasha: Asking and discussing is not forbidden, rather prohibited on this forum
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Kulka Kurdayati
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bullshit

One of my heval had this coin (if i remember correctly in Duhok, but not sure 100%). Actually i dont know what exactly it is, only that it is very old. Anyone maybe recognize and can say something more?
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Edited by Kulka Kurdayati, 4th August 2013 - 05:39 AM.
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Diako
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Biji LGBT Takbir...Takbir

First coin looks like a fire altar, it has something to do with zoroastrianism.

Second coin looks like a side view of a face, stylised beard and hair and prominent nose.
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Ali Alqosh
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Kulka Kurdayati
4th August 2013 - 05:39 AM
One of my heval had this coin (if i remember correctly in Duhok, but not sure 100%). Actually i dont know what exactly it is, only that it is very old. Anyone maybe recognize and can say something more?
one of them seems to be jewish? or greek?

:kflag: :kflag: :kflag: :kflag: :kflag: :kflag: :kflag: :kflag: :kflag:
Edited by Ali Alqosh, 16th October 2013 - 04:02 PM.
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Tesseract
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That's def a Zoroastrian fire altar. Compare with this Sasanian coin:

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It's likely the coin is Sasanian.
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RawandKurdistani
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Surchi/Xoshnawi

Sorani folktales from Kirkuk and Slemani in English. I've never heard any of these, but here you go

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I am confused by God's wisdom:
In this world of States
Why have the Kurds remained Stateless, dispossessed,
What for have they all become fugitives, condemned?


Ahmad Khani

Feed the hungry and visit a sick person
And free the captive
If he be unjustly confined
Assist any person oppressed
Whether Muslim or non-Muslim


- Prophet Muhammad Ibn Abdullah (PBUH)


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UKurd
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RawandKurdistani
15th September 2014 - 04:06 AM
Sorani folktales from Kirkuk and Slemani in English. I've never heard any of these, but here you go

none of those ring any bells, weres the actuall folklores lol
We live together, we are oppressed together, we fight together, we succeed together, we are free together.
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RawandKurdistani
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UKurd
15th September 2014 - 04:11 AM
RawandKurdistani
15th September 2014 - 04:06 AM
Sorani folktales from Kirkuk and Slemani in English. I've never heard any of these, but here you go

none of those ring any bells, weres the actuall folklores lol
UKurd, have you ever heard of "Zena ba Zerd" (or something in that direction)? I was always told that as a bedtime story up until the start of elementary school.
Edited by RawandKurdistani, 15th September 2014 - 04:19 AM.
I am confused by God's wisdom:
In this world of States
Why have the Kurds remained Stateless, dispossessed,
What for have they all become fugitives, condemned?


Ahmad Khani

Feed the hungry and visit a sick person
And free the captive
If he be unjustly confined
Assist any person oppressed
Whether Muslim or non-Muslim


- Prophet Muhammad Ibn Abdullah (PBUH)


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UKurd
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Slemanci

RawandKurdistani
15th September 2014 - 04:18 AM
UKurd
15th September 2014 - 04:11 AM

Quoting limited to 2 levels deep
UKurd, have you ever heard of "Zena ba Zerd" (or something in that direction)? I was always told that as a bedtime story up until the start of elementary school.
i dont think so heval, however i have herd the one about those men that have 3 dots on their cheeks that suposedly go round killing people, it was a bedtime story for me wich then turned out to be real, it was one of them "listen to me or these guys will come kill you storys" scary shizz lol
our folklores vary from region to region, we were mostly influenced by hewrami and jaff storys, their all either horror or romance
Edited by UKurd, 15th September 2014 - 04:39 AM.
We live together, we are oppressed together, we fight together, we succeed together, we are free together.
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RawandKurdistani
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UKurd
15th September 2014 - 04:36 AM
RawandKurdistani
15th September 2014 - 04:18 AM

Quoting limited to 2 levels deep
i dont think so heval, however i have herd the one about those men that have 3 dots on their cheeks that suposedly go round killing people, it was a bedtime story for me wich then turned out to be real, it was one of them "listen to me or these guys will come kill you storys" scary shizz lol
our folklores vary from region to region, we were mostly influenced by hewrami and jaff storys, their all either horror or romance
Around us it's only romance lol Xoybun would love the tale of Zena ba Zerd, it's basically about a beautiful blonde woman (hence the name: Zena = The girl, Ba Zerd = With yellow, aka: blonde hair) who get's kidnapped by a bad man, and is locked up until she manages to escape. Thereafter a Prince finds her while she's showering in a lake and instantly falls in love. They end up getting married, as in the average romantic folktale.
I am confused by God's wisdom:
In this world of States
Why have the Kurds remained Stateless, dispossessed,
What for have they all become fugitives, condemned?


Ahmad Khani

Feed the hungry and visit a sick person
And free the captive
If he be unjustly confined
Assist any person oppressed
Whether Muslim or non-Muslim


- Prophet Muhammad Ibn Abdullah (PBUH)


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